Mars

The High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express has returned images of Echus Chasma, one of the largest water source regions on the Red Planet. Echus Chasma is the source region of Kasei Valles which extends 3000 km to the north. The data was acquired on 25 September 2005. The pictures are centred at about 1° north and 278° east and have a ground resolution of approximately 17 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Perspective view of Echus Chasma
The High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express has returned images of Echus Chasma, one of the largest water source regions on the Red Planet. Echus Chasma is the source region of Kasei Valles which extends 3000 km to the north. The data was acquired on 25 September 2005. The pictures are centred at about 1° north and 278° east and have a ground resolution of approximately 17 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Echus Chasma, nadir view
The High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard the ESA spacecraft Mars Express obtained images focusing on a depression that displays a crater at the end of the long, winding valley, Mamers Valles.

The data was obtained on 5 August 2006 with a ground resolution of approximately 14 m/per pixel. The image is centred at approximately 39° north and 17° east on the planet.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Mamers Valles Perspective View
The High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard the ESA spacecraft Mars Express obtained images focusing on a depression that displays a crater at the end of the long, winding valley, Mamers Valles.

The data was obtained on 5 August 2006 with a ground resolution of approximately 14 m/per pixel. The image is centred at approximately 39° north and 17° east on the planet.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Mamers Valles Perspective View
The High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard the ESA spacecraft Mars Express obtained images focusing on a depression that displays a crater at the end of the long, winding valley, Mamers Valles.

The data was obtained on 5 August 2006 with a ground resolution of approximately 14 m/per pixel. The image is centred at approximately 39° north and 17° east on the planet.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Crater in Mamers Valles
The High Resolution Stereo Camera on board ESA's Mars Express orbiter imaged Nepenthes Mensae, a river delta on Mars, on 22 January 2008.

The data was acquired in the region lying at approximately 3° north and 121° east with a ground resolution of 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Perspective View of Nepenthes Mensae
The High Resolution Stereo Camera on board ESA's Mars Express orbiter imaged Nepenthes Mensae, a river delta on Mars, on 22 January 2008.

The data was acquired in the region lying at approximately 3° north and 121° east with a ground resolution of 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Nepenthes Mensae, Perspective View
The High Resolution Stereo Camera on board ESA's Mars Express orbiter imaged Nepenthes Mensae, a river delta on Mars, on 22 January 2008.

The data was acquired in the region lying at approximately 3° north and 121° east with a ground resolution of 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Nepenthes Mensae False-Colour Nadir View
The High Resolution Stereo Camera on board ESA's Mars Express orbiter imaged Nepenthes Mensae, a river delta on Mars, on 22 January 2008.

The data was acquired in the region lying at approximately 3° north and 121° east with a ground resolution of 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Nepenthes Mensae
Perspective view of Hebes Chasma obtained by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA's Mars Express spacecraft.

Hebes Chasma is located at approximately 1° south and 282° east. The HRSC obtained image data on 16 September 2005 with a ground resolution of approximately 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Hebes Chasma, Perspective View
Perspective view of Hebes Chasma obtained by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA's Mars Express spacecraft.

Hebes Chasma is located at approximately 1° south and 282° east. The HRSC obtained image data on 16 September 2005 with a ground resolution of approximately 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Hebes Chasma, Perspective View
Perspective view of Hebes Chasma obtained by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA's Mars Express spacecraft.

Hebes Chasma is located at approximately 1° south and 282° east. The HRSC obtained image data on 16 September 2005 with a ground resolution of approximately 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Hebes Chasma, Perspective View
This is an ortho-image of Hebes Chasma, a trough in the Grand Canyon of Mars. The image is overlaid with elevation data from an HRSC-derived high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM).

In an ortho-image, the projecting rays are perpendicular to the plane of projection. This corrects any deformations introduced by an imaging camera. Such an image can be fitted directly on to a map.

Hebes Chasma is located at approximately 1° south and 282° east. Image data was obtained on 16 September 2005 with a ground resolution of approximately 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Hebes Chasma, Colour-Coded Elevation Model
Hebes Chasma is an enclosed trough, almost 8000 m deep, in Valles Marineris, the Grand Canyon of Mars, where water is believed to have flowed. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA's Mars Express studied the area providing new pictorial clues to its history.

Hebes Chasma is located at approximately 1° south and 282° east. Image data was obtained on 16 September 2005 with a ground resolution of approximately 15 m/pixel.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Hebes Chasma
This is an image of Daedalia Planum, located 1000 km south of Arsia Mons, a southern volcano of the Tharsis Montes. The image was taken on 19 July 2005, from a distance of 302 km from the surface.

The image is centred at 235.4° east and 26.2° south. The scene spans a width of 100 km and the ground resolution is 25 m/pixel.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum).
 
 
Daedalia Planum
Promethei Planum, an area seasonally covered with a layer of ice more than 3500-m thick layer of ice in the martian south polar region, was the subject of the High Resolution Stereo Camera’s (HRSC) focus on 22 September 2005 as Mars Express was in orbit above the Red Planet.

Promethei Planum lies at approximately 76° south and 105° east.

Credits: ESA/ DLR/ FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Promethei Planum Perspective View
Promethei Planum, an area seasonally covered with a layer of ice more than 3500-m thick layer of ice in the martian south polar region, was the subject of the High Resolution Stereo Camera’s (HRSC) focus on 22 September 2005 as Mars Express was in orbit above the Red Planet.

Promethei Planum lies at approximately 76° south and 105° east.

Credits: ESA/ DLR/ FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Promethei Planum Perspective View
Promethei Planum, an area seasonally covered with layer of ice more than 3500 m thick layer of ice in the martian south polar region, was the subject of the High Resolution Stereo Camera’s focus on 22 September 2005 as Mars Express was in orbit above the Red Planet.

Promethei Planum lies at approximately 76° south and 105° east.

An approximately 100 km-large and 800 m-deep impact crater is visible in the northern part of the image. The crater’s interior is partly covered in ice.

In the centre of the image are structures that may have been created by basaltic lava flow from a volcano. This area is covered in ice. The dark dunes towards the bottom of the image are most likely made up of dust originating from this lava flow or volcanic ash.

A broad sheet of ice, which is an extension of the south polar ice cap is located south of the lava flow, to the left in the (nadir) image. The steep flanks clearly show white, clean ice. The thickness of the ice is between 900 and 1100 m.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Promethei Planum
Mars Express took snapshots of Candor Chasma, a valley in the northern part of Valles Marineris, as it was in orbit above the region on 6 July 2006.

The High Resolution Stereo Camera on the orbiter obtained the data in orbit number 3195, with a ground resolution of approximately 20 m/pixel. Candor Chasma lies at approximately 6° south and 290° east.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum).
 
 
Perspective view of Candor Chasma
Mars Express took snapshots of Candor Chasma, a valley in the northern part of Valles Marineris, as it was in orbit above the region on 6 July 2006.

The High Resolution Stereo Camera on the orbiter obtained the data in orbit number 3195, with a ground resolution of approximately 20 m/pixel. Candor Chasma lies at approximately 6° south and 290° east.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum).
 
 
Perspective view of Candor Chasma
Mars Express took snapshots of Candor Chasma, a valley in the northern part of Valles Marineris, as it was in orbit above the region on 6 July 2006.

The High Resolution Stereo Camera on the orbiter obtained the data in orbit number 3195, with a ground resolution of approximately 20 m/pixel. Candor Chasma lies at approximately 6° south and 290° east.

Valles Marineris is an approximately 3000-km-long canyon system on Mars. Candor Chasma, situated in its northern part, is part of a radial graben system. A graben is a feature bound by parallel normal faults, where the graben floor moves downward relative to the adjoining material. The grabens in the area were created radially, as the Tharsis bulge formed due to volcanic uplift.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum).
 
 
Candor Chasma, nadir view
This is a mosaic of Olympus Mons, the highest volcano on Mars, which towers 26 km above the surrounding plains. The image covers an area of approximately 600 000 sq km and is colour-coded according to height based on data from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM). The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express orbiter imaged the region over 18 orbits.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Mars in 3D
The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA’s Mars Express orbiter imaged the Terby crater on Mars on 13 April 2007 during orbit 4199. The region is of great scientific interest as sediments there reveal information on the role of water in the history of the planet.

This perspective view was calculated from the digital terrain model derived from the HRSC stereo channels.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
A Perspective Ciew of Terby Crater
The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA’s Mars Express orbiter imaged the Terby crater on Mars on 13 April 2007 during orbit 4199. The region is of great scientific interest as sediments there hold information on the role of water in the history of the planet.

This perspective view was calculated from the digital terrain model derived from the HRSC stereo channels.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Terby Crater, Perspective View
This image of Terby crater was derived from three HRSC colour channels and the nadir channel of the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA’s Mars Express orbiter. The Terby crater region is of great scientific interest as sediments there hold information on the role of water in the history of the planet.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Terby Crater
This false-colour image of Terby crater on Mars was derived from three HRSC colour channels and the nadir channel of the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA’s Mars Express orbiter. The Terby crater region is of great scientific interest as sediments there reveal information on the role of water in the history of the planet.

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Terby Crater in False Colour
This perspective view of the Noctis Labyrinthus region, the 'Labyrinth of the Night' on Mars was obtained with data from the High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), onboard ESA's Mars Express.

The HRSC took these pictures on 25 June 2006 in orbit 3155, with a ground resolution of approximately 16 m/pixel.

This perspective view has been calculated from the digital terrain model derived from the stereo channels.

Credits: ESA/ DLR/ FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Noctis Labyrinthus
This image was taken by the High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), onboard ESA's Mars Express imaged the Noctis Labyrinthus region, the 'Labyrinth of the Night' on Mars.

The HRSC took these pictures on 25 June 2006 in orbit 3155, with a ground resolution of approximately 16 m/pixel.

This perspective view has been calculated from the digital terrain model derived from the stereo channels.

Credits: ESA/ DLR/ FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Noctis Labyrinthus
This image was taken by the High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), onboard ESA's Mars Express imaged the Noctis Labyrinthus region, the 'Labyrinth of the Night' on Mars.

The HRSC took these pictures on 25 June 2006 in orbit 3155, with a ground resolution of approximately 16 m/pixel.

This colour scene has been derived from the three HRSC colour channels and the nadir channel.

Credits: ESA/ DLR/ FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Noctis Labyrinthus
This image of the Martian north polar ice cap shows layers of water ice and dust for the first time in perspective view. Here we see cliffs which are almost 2 kilometres high, and the dark material in the caldera-like structures and dune fields could be volcanic ash.

Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
 
 
Martian North Polar Ice Cap
Page 3 of 5
Jump to:  
Album ID: 10 
Sort By  



Random Image

 
 
A burst of color
Browse Album
?

Countdown

Cassini Dione D-3 flyby
0 days, 0 hours, 0 minutes

NuSTAR launch
0 days

MSL Curiosity Mars landing
0 days

Featured Science Result News